By Nolan Kowal, Sport Performance Specialist

Youth aged 12 to 17 years attending indoor sport and recreational facilities must provide proof that they have received:

  • at least one dose of an approved vaccine, or 
  • proof of a pharmacist-confirmed negative result from an approved rapid antigen test, from within the 72 hours before participation

It is the responsibility of the facility operator to ensure all other public health orders are followed.

In partnership with the Department of Sport, Culture, Heritage, as well as sport and education stakeholders, the Manitoba government has prepared guidance for facility operators, sports organizations, and schools to ensure they are in compliance with the public health orders.

For information on proof of vaccination, the scope of the orders, and how to collect and manage personal health information, visit:
https://www.gov.mb.ca/covid19/testing/testing-youth-indoor-sports.html  

This information is also available in a fact sheet that can be downloaded or printed, and shared with your teams.

Recreation Manitoba has complied additional resources for sport on its website:

  • Sample of a negative rapid antigen test from a pharmacy
  • Sample of proof of a single dose record from Shared Health website
  • A reference guide for COVID-19 screeners

 

Current public health orders in effect for the Sport Manitoba facility and for sport:

 

Outdoor Sport and recreational facilities must not open unless the operator of the facility ensures that:

  • the number of spectators at the facility does not exceed 50% of the usual spectator capacity of the facility or 250 people, whichever is less; and
  • no tournaments are held at the facility
    Tournaments are defined as a single or multi-day gathering of three or more sport teams, who come together outside regular league play, but does not include; a gathering where team members compete on an individual basis against members of other teams.

Indoor sport, including the Sport Manitoba facility:

Except for ticketed sporting events under Order 16, indoor sporting and recreational facilities, including dance schools and martial arts studios, must not operate unless the operator

  • ensures that the number of spectators at the facility does not exceed 50% of the usual spectator capacity of the facility or 250 people, whichever is less;
  • restricts admission of members of the public to the facility to the following:
    • persons who produce proof of vaccination,
    • persons who produce proof from the Government of Manitoba that there is a medical reason for the person not to receive a vaccine for COVID-19,
    • persons under 12 years of age,
    • persons who are at least 12 years of age but who have not yet reached 18 years of age and who produce
      • proof that they have received one dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech or Moderna vaccine for COVID-19, or
      • proof of a negative rapid COVID-19 test result within the previous 72 hours that is confirmed by a pharmacist or by staff at a nursing station on a First Nation; and
  • ensures that no tournaments are held at the facility.Tournaments are defined as a single or multi-day gathering of three or more sport teams, who come together outside regular league play, but does not include; a gathering where team members compete on an individual basis against members of other teams.

Current public health orders and information can be found on the Government of Manitoba’s website: gov.mb.ca/covid19/prs/orders

 

Return to Play

The provincial sport organization makes the final decision on return-to-play plans for their sport. The government does not, although the restrictions and guidelines put in place by the government and health authorities are built into the plans. Sport organizations can strengthen or amplify the regulations if they choose. To review a return-to-play plan, please visit the provincial sport organization’s website.

For accurate, timely information on COVID-19, visit Manitoba.ca/covid19

 

Contact tracing, high-risk settings, and isolation

First, some definitions:

The period of communicability is when you are most likely to spread COVID-19 to others. For those who are symptomatic, the period of communicability is from two days prior to the onset of symptoms through to 10 days from the start of your symptoms. For those who test positive and have no symptoms (asymptomatic), the period of communicability extends from two days before your lab test to 10 days after you had the test.

Close contacts are people who you have shared space with during your period of communicability. Specifically, these are people you were within two metres/six feet for a total of 10 minutes over a 24-hour period.

In most situations, public health officials will no longer be notifying close contacts. Confirmed COVID-19 cases will be asked to notify their own contacts.

Below is a flow chart on what to do in each scenario in regards to isolation, or view the high-res PDF here.